Digital Digging

Photo Credit: Distant Hill Gardens Flickr via Compfight cc

It’s interesting how our digital identity is just as important as our real identity. We can learn so much about someone just by their posts on Facebook, pictures on Instagram, tweets on Twitter, and ideas from their blogs. We piece these snippets of information together to make a picture of who they are.

Savannah and I teamed up in our Google Community, and I was more than pleased to have her as my partner. I started my digital investigation on who she is with typing her name into Google. Initially finding information about Savannah was difficult as she didn’t have a Facebook profile, and her LinkedIn profile was blocked to me. I don’t have a LinkedIn account.

I did find Savannah in Instagram and realized she uses this website as a digital scrapbook. Family and friends are obviously important to her. She enjoys the outdoors, the Roughriders, and dotes on her son who loves hockey.

I did find articles in the Regina Leader Post, Ottawa Citizen, and Vancouver Sun that highlighted a business venture she had with her mom as a Concierge. They helped community members with grocery shopping and other errands, which shows a business spirit and connection to community. Here is my original digital diagnosis of Savannah.

When I looked for Savannah on Twitter I realized she also has another name. At first, I was confused.  When I talked to Savannah she explained she has chosen to use her mother’s  maiden name, as her mom reverted to this after a divorce. Savannah wanted to be supportive of her mom, and I respect that. Savannah has her birth name identity above, and her chosen family name identity which follows.

Apparently, it’s quite normal to have several different accounts and identities on the internet as the article “Having Multiple online Identities is More Normal Than You Think” by Nicole Lee she explains, “In reality, having multiple social media accounts is pretty common.” Most people have many social media accounts. I understand people compartmentalize themselves with different social media accounts for different activities; I too have two Facebook accounts, one for family, the other for friends. Savannah is following this trend.

Savannah’s Facebook is full of positive information. She is an EA for Regina Public Schools and was previously an EA at Montessori School of Regina. She enjoys yoga, running, and beach volleyball. She has a brother and sister, as well as a 10-year-old son. All of her photos on Facebook are pleasant and professional.

When looking at Savannah’s Twitter account I found that she has a positive Twitter feed.  Savannah @SavannahBenko share’s and retweets within the class community in a professional way. Savannah has joined three chat groups #whatisschool, #tlap, and #saskedchat, and gained many followers from these experiences. She has a good mixture of shares and tweets, within her twitter feed, which reinforces her positive digital identity.

Savannah’s blog also portrays a positive, professional identity. Her posts are informative, easy to read, and interesting. As Crystal Keshane says in her blog post “Identity of Jade Sleuthing the Pfeifer” “These posts allow us sleuths to follow [Savannah] on her educational journey and learning.” It’s exciting to watch Savannah learn and grow. Here is my digital analysis for Savannah’s chosen name.

Photo Credit: isapisa Flickr via Compfight cc

All of this digging for digital identity has made me realize that Paul Gordon Brown has a point in his article “Digital Identity is not about Separate Identity at all”, when he says “we are a collection of connections and enmeshed in networks and webs” he demonstrates through a beautiful metaphor how we and the internet are interconnected and evolving.

Photo Credit: IthacaBarbie Flickr via Compfight cc

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2 thoughts on “Digital Digging

  1. Pingback: What Goes On the Internet Stays On the Internet | Anthea Holczer

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